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Tractor Wagon

We get a lot of use from our wheelbarrows and garden cart. But Dan wanted something that could carry larger, heavier loads than what we can manage with those, especially since most of this year's firewood is down the hill in the woods. We looked at both new and used pull carts for lawn tractors, but in the end, he decided to build a wagon from an old riding lawn mower.

Dan tore an old broken riding mower down to just the frame. 

The two by fours were scraps. Their function is to raise the bed
of the wagon above the back tires. The angle iron came from the 
crate our chipper was shipped in. Dan cut and welded it to fit.

The sides are pressure-treated decking boards.

Steering closeup. Dan had to do a bit of welding to get the steering stable.

Ditto with the tractor side.

Then a bit of paint,

and she was ready to go.

The only advantage a commercial cart has over Dan's is that they can dump their loads, while this one can't. But that's a small trade-off for making something mostly out of materials we already had. Dan bought only the decking boards, so the entire wagon cost under $20 to make.

The wagon holds 5 wheelbarrow loads of wood chips.

Being able to transport larger, heavier loads is the kind of useful convenience that enables us to work smarter not harder. We need to get the job done without wearing ourselves out! And that helps us keep things manageable as we get older.

Our workhorse wagon is champion at hauling firewood.

The right equipment is so important around a homestead, although I have to say it usually takes us awhile to figure it out. That probably sounds strange, but with a limited budget we often do things by hand because at the time there isn't another choice. As we analyze what we do and how we do it, we discuss options and look for sensible technology; usually the simpler the better. It takes some time to make decisions, but I think we've been able to make the best choices for us that way.

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